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    A-level and GCSE exam results

    A-level and GCSE exam results are out very soon, but the pandemic means that things are a little different. So, here’s what you need to know about this year’s results.

    The exams and assessments were cancelled this year due to coronavirus (COVID-19). However, most students will still receive grades in time to progress to further study or employment. A-levels results are released on Thursday 13 August; GCSEs on Thursday 20 August.

    Earlier today (Wednesday 12 August), the Department for Education announced a “triple lock” on exam results in England this year. Students’ grades will be the highest out of their estimated grades, their mocks and an optional written exam in the autumn – meaning that final results will be no lower than mock exams. All outcomes will hold the same value for universities, colleges and employers.

    More information about how estimated grades will be calculated, plus advice about options available if students don’t get the grades they wanted is available on the government’s website.

    Police launch campaign to raise awareness of online CSE

    Devon and Cornwall Police have launched an awareness campaign to ask the public to help spot the signs of online Child Sexual Exploitation (CSE) (more…)

    Acronyms and terminology demystified

    We hope this list will keep evolving – if you are aware of an acronym that needs adding please send the detail to your locality mailbox.

    AfC                         Action for Children.  Children’s Centres

    ASB                        Anti-Social Behaviour

    ASD                        Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    CARA                     Child At Risk Alert (Police)

    CC                           Children’s Centre

    CFHD                     Children & family Health Devon (previously Virgin)

    CME                       Child Missing Education

    CORC                     Child Outcomes Research Consortium. How to measure children and young people’s mental health & wellbeing. (link on DCFP [EH] website)

    CSE                         Child Sexual Exploitation

    CVS                        Community & Voluntary Services

    DCFP                     Devon Children & Families Partnership (previously DSCB)

    DfE                         Department for Education

    DIAS                      Devon Information & Advice Service– parents of children with additional needs can be referred to DIAS for advice, support and advocacy re access to education

    DICS                       Devon Integrated Children’s Services

    DLA                        Disability Living Allowance

    DSL                         Designated Safeguarding Lead

    DV                          Domestic Violence

    DWP                      Department Work & Pensions

    EH                          Early Help– An approach bringing together people from a range of services. Support for families from pre-birth to adolescents before any formal interventions. Main point of contact= lead worker. Early Help has 6 criteria on which they are judged as payments by results (PBR) are made from the government for the Troubled Families programme. This will end at end of March 2021.

    EHA                       Early Help Assessment. Families can refer themselves for an EHA or can be referred by a teacher, Health Visitor, GP etc.

    EHCP                     Education Health & Care Plan

    EHP                        Early Help Plan.  EHP states who is going to do what and when, including things a family can do to help themselves.

    ESA                        Employment Support Allowance. (Formerly Incapacity Benefit). You can apply for ESA if you have a disability or health condition that affects how much you can work.

    ETE                         Young people engaged in Education Training or Employment

    EWO                      Education Welfare Officer

    EYFS                      Early Years Foundation Stage

    FGCP                     Family Group Conference Plus– offer a range of meetings including family group conferences and restorative meetings aimed at achieving positive change.

    FIT                          Family Intervention Team– offers practical support, advice, how to build strengths and skills. Connects families with YIT, Domestic Violence support, DWP etc

    FP                           Family Practitioner

    IDVA                      Independent Domestic Violence Advisor – The role of the IDVA is to provide safety advice and support to victims of domestic abuse who are at high risk as measured using the DASH Risk Assessment.

    IS                            Income Support. To help to cover costs if the person has a low income and gets the severe disability premium.

    JSA                         Job Seekers Allowance

    LADO                     Local Authority Designated Officer– deals with allegations made against an adult working with children

    LO                           Locality Officer

    MACE                    Missing Child Exploitation

    MARAC                Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference.  A victim-focused information sharing and risk management meeting attended by all key agencies where high risk cases are discussed.

    MASH                   Multi-Agency Safeguarding Hub. A partnership between DCC, Children’s social care, education, youth services, NHS, police & probation working together to safeguard children. If a professional, family member or the public have a concern they can contact the MASH to make an enquiry.

    MDA                      Multi-Disciplinary Assessment

    NEET                      A young person: Not in Employment, Education or Training

    OoSC                     Out of School Club

    PBR                        Payment by Results

    PHNT                     Public Health Nursing Team

    PIP                         Personal Independence Payment

    PNMHT                Perinatal Mental Health Team

    PPAP                     Parents Plus Adolescents Programme – Evidence-based parenting course promoting effective communication in families with adolescents aged 11 – 16 years.

    PTC                        Parent to Child

    QA                          Quality Assurance

    REACH                  Reducing Exploitation & Absence from Care or Home– a service which supports young people who either run away or who are at risk of CSE

    RfAS                      Request for Additional Services

    RfC                         Right for Children – a web-based system that enables practitioners from a range of agencies, services and team to input and share information about the families they are working with.

    ROI                         Record of Intervention

    SEMH                    Social, Emotional, Mental Health problem

    SEN                        Special Educational Needs

    SEND                     Special Educational Needs and Disabilities

    SFP                         Strengthening Families Programme– Strengthening Families training is for over 8-year olds. 8 sessions with children in the evening with food…

    SGO                       Special Guardianship Order

    SMART                 Specific, Measurable, Agreed, Realistic, with Timescale– for writing a good Early Help Plan

    SOEH                     Support Officer, Early Help

    SPA                        Single Point of Access

    TAC                        ‘Team around the Child’

    TAF                        Team Around the Family (TAF). The family and relevant agencies working with them are known collectively as the ‘Team around the Family’. A TAF meeting, engages effectively with the family and relevant professionals. The aim is to produce a plan of coordinated support enabling a child, or young person, and their family to achieve agreed outcomes within specified timescales.

    TDC                        Teignbridge District Council

    UC                          Universal Credit. A payment to help with living costs. It replaces Child Tax Credit, Housing Benefit, Income Support, Job seeker’s Allowance, Working Tax Credit

    VI                            Visually Impaired

    ViST                       Vulnerable incident Screening Tool (Police) Police complete an incident form if children are present when they are called to a property, often related to a call about Domestic Abuse. Police will send this CARA to their safeguarding hub and data the police have – either about the property or about the people named on the report (or both) and this is then known as a ViST.

    YES                         Youth Enquiry Service

    YIT                          Youth Intervention Team

    YOT                        Youth Offending Team

     

     

    Assessment Triangle is used to identify different aspects of intervention to look at.

    Family Outcome Star      A method to help to create a plan for a family- used by FIT.

    Family Practitioner works with the whole family

    Roots    Mental health/ bereavement

    Step down to Early Help– Social Services might ‘step down’ a family from their care to Early Help. They should hold a closing meeting with EH

    Talk works– for depression/ anxiety

    Troubled Families Programme is a programme of targeted intervention for families with multiple problems, including crime, anti-social behaviour, truancy, unemployment, mental health problems and domestic abuse. One aim of the Programme is to tackle issues before they require costlier interventions. It involves the adoption of a ‘whole family approach’ and multi-agency working.

    Young Devon– mental health support

    Young Minds– A charity working for people’s mental health. Tips, advice and guidance on where to get support for mental health. Youngminds.org.uk

     

     

     

    Meeting with Devon Youth Parliament

    On 3 March 2021, members of Devon’s Youth Parliament met with key managers and leaders within the DCFP to discuss the results of the Make Your Mark survey and put forward the views of young people on a number of priority topics.

    This is what was discussed and the actions that resulted from these conversations.

    Free university

    Young people’s views: This was the top result nationally from the Make Your Mark survey, with access to training and jobs being the third highest result. We believe this high ranking is largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the wider impact this has played – for example, cancelling Year 10 work experience. The hospitality industry is mostly closed, which has prevented many young people from entering their first job. There is also concern around financial future for young people generally. Is a good career only for the privileged few?

    Request: To support the campaign for free university places and extend opportunities for young people to access ongoing training and work opportunities. And to make sure that all young people who have missed out on works-experience due to COVID-19 still get that opportunity later.

    Action: Youth Parliament will continue to ask other young people about their views on training, jobs and higher education so that we can include more youth voices into this discussion.

    Mental health

    Young people’s views: This was the top national issue among Devon’s young people. The Exeter Insight Instagram page was created in response to last year’s Make Your Mark results to reach out to Exeter young people, spread information and offer peer support. We plan to rename this so that it is accessible to more young people.

    Request: More to be done to support young people early and ensure that their return to school provides chances to talk to adults and get help where needed. Every young person should have a ‘trusted adult’ who they feel comfortable speaking to, and all young people should know how best to support their peers rather than shouldering that burden alone. Young people who care for their friends’ mental health need someone to talk to as well.

    Action: Dawn Stabb (Devon County Council’s Head of Education and Learning) will work with schools to provide easy access to support. The upcoming Devon Youth Council will hopefully include representatives from the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) participation group.

    Greener Devon

    Young people’s views: Youth Parliament’s Greener Devon Week took place in October 2020. Greener Devon will now become a year-long campaign. Plastic pollution is a large concern among young people.

    Request: More to do, including with large-scale litter picks being considered.

    Action: This is part of a wider Devon Plan and young people are keen to get involved.

    Domestic violence and homelessness

    Young people’s views: Both of these are high local priorities in Devon. Some young people may be experiencing this themselves or know friends who are. Violence may be increasing in unsafe homes due to stay-at-home rules; as such, awareness about increasing violence should be raised. Fundraising for charities could be organised.

    Request: Further information about domestic violence and sexual abuse (DVSA) through schools will aid with increasing awareness and signposting you people towards help with domestic abuse.

    Action: Work together with young people with the Domestic Violence and Abuse strategy. Michele Thornberry will take this forward.

    Young people in abusive relationships

    Young people’s views: Young people in abusive relationships do not always know who to contact. They may be scared to tell adults and feel less safe if more people become aware. While teachers can pick up on aspects that seem unusual, being out of school means these opportunities for teachers to intervene have almost vanished.

    Request: Young people experiencing abusive relationships need to have support to know what this looks like and what to do.

    Action: Improve the information and access to the information available to young people. A challenge set to adults in the session, to look from the perspective of a young person seeking help. Action for the Partnership to ensure there are clear routes to access support and information for young people.

    Employment and employability skills

    Young people’s views: A lack of knowledge about writing CVs, applying for work, and gaining work experience was also a large concern. Practical support is needed to help young people take their first steps into work. Work experience for Year 10 students has been cancelled during the pandemic which greatly impacts early working skills.

    Request: Young people in school would like assistance with learning employability skills and entering work.

    Action: Dawn Stabb will be reaching out to schools to encourage teaching employability skills. Fiona Fleming (Devon’ County Council’s Head of Commissioning for Children’s Services) suggested inviting Phill Adams (Employment and Skills Senior Manager at Devon County Council) to Youth Parliament meetings to discuss the work being done to support young people into work.

    Socialising with friends and classmates

    Young people’s views: Among younger year groups, the inability to socialise with classmates is a concern. Online learning is very distant and unengaging as many students turn their cameras off or lack the technology to engage in the same way as other students. Social skills are very important and the opportunity to interact with classmates and friends has deteriorated significantly over the past year. Young people need these social skills.

    Request: Offer opportunities for connecting with peers, having a chance to play and have fun together. Some schools have set this up and they worked well, this could have a wider implementation.

    Action: To influence the plans for improving emotional health and wellbeing as a strategic focus for the DCFP. Emotional Health and Wellbeing Group to build this into their strategy.

    Returning to school

    Young people’s views: The members of the Youth Parliament are looking forward to returning to school to interact with their friends and return to classroom learning, they think this is the case from many young people. However, a gradual phased-in approach to returning to school would be ideal as the sudden routine change could be adverse.

    Request: Information and support around upcoming exams and GCSEs have been lacking and difficult to follow. Devon Youth Parliament also suggested giving students a choice to continue learning remotely when they wish.

    Action: Dawn Stabb will raise these points at her meetings with headteachers across Devon.

    Summer holiday

    Young people’s views: The idea of mandatory, catch-up summer schools was strongly disagreed with. However, one Youth Parliament member and her dad, who is a teacher, trialled a summer camp during 2020 at her village park. All the young people who attended had something to do and the event was enjoyed by all. It was pointed out by the DCFP that any events we organise must be enjoyable and provide fun for those involved.

    Request: A Devon-wide summer camp for children and young people was to have fun and socialise, while incorporating education and possibly employment skill development into the activities.

    Action: Play events over the summer being organised by the DCFP will incorporate Youth Parliament ideas.

    Future concerns

    Young people’s views: A big concern about returning to school is the potential for COVID-19 cases within the classroom. Another lockdown is also a concern, alongside the potential for further virus variants, vaccine ineffectiveness, and further disruptions to education and home life.

    Request: To understand the effect that further lockdowns will have on children and work on different ways to keep in touch and connect if this was to happen.

    Action: Any incident management planning to address this concern if we are to close schools again.

    Contact between Youth Parliament and DCFP

    Young people’s views: More regular contact with the Youth Parliament would be welcomed, to begin encouraging communication between the DCFP and Youth Parliament to merge ideas together. Obtaining opinions and ideas from a diverse group of young people will help with responding to the needs of young people. The Youth Parliament also welcomes the DCFP’s insight into topics they are concerned about.

    Action: Contact between the Youth Parliament and DCFP to be set up on a regular basis and consideration given to the engagement of young people with the strategic and service development sub-groups. Devon Youth Parliament are working with Schools to develop youth forums where they can engage with a wider network of young people to inform their policies and campaigns.


    The UK Youth Parliament Devon is a group of young people, elected by their peers to represent them on issues affecting young people in Devon, locally, regionally and nationally. You can find out more about Youth Parliament and other ways for children and young people to get involved and have their say on matters in Devon.

    Child Exploitation Awareness day

    Child exploitation (CE) encompasses sexual and criminal exploitation, trafficking, modern slavery and other forms of adolescent vulnerability. And to highlight the issue, National Child Exploitation Awareness day is taking place on Thursday 18 March.

    The National Working Group (NWG) are continuing to lead the campaign and their five keys messages for National Child Exploitation Awareness 2021 are as follows:

    • Exploitation is about more than just CSE, think criminal exploitation, county lines, trafficking and modern slavery
    • Families can be safeguarding partners
    • Exploitation and its impact doesn’t stop because you turn 18
    • The time to build relationships with children and families is crucial
    • Communities can tackle exploitation

    The NWG are also asking people to write a personal pledge on their hand to show support for their “Helping Hands” campaign, and share on social media using #CEADAY21 and #HelpingHands.

    Find more information at STOP CSE – National Child Exploitation Awareness Day.

    We would encourage everyone to think, spot and speak out against exploitation abuse and utilise the tools and Safer Me Assessment from the Adolescent Safety Framework to support and create safety for are young people.

    Exams and school attendance update

    GCSEs and A and AS Level exams will not go ahead this summer, the Education Secretary has confirmed. Instead, there will be some form of teacher-assessed grading. The details of how that will happen are not yet finalised, but we will provide details when they are.

    Students studying for vocational and technical qualifications should hear from their schools or colleges about their January exams and assessments.

    Meanwhile, student attendance in schools is currently about 26 per cent in primary schools and 10 per cent in secondary schools, which includes both local authority schools and academies. There are about 93,000 children in school in Devon, approximately 56,000 in primaries and 37,000 in secondaries.

    Devon County Council Deputy Leader and Cabinet Member for Schools, James McInnes, said:

    “Heads and school staff are working really hard to ensure that children are able to learn, whether that’s in the classroom or virtually.

    “The coronavirus crisis has worsened considerably since Christmas and guidelines are having to change to take account of that so our schools are coping with regularly changing advice.

    “But many heads and teachers are innovating with real flair. Some schools in Devon are streaming live classroom lessons to children at home and others are recording lessons so that families can make use of them at a time which is convenient to them. That’s particularly helpful if parents are working at home and only have limited devices.

    “I know combining classroom learning with virtual learning is adding to teachers’ workload, but I’m glad to see more children actually coming to school than in the last lockdown. It means parents are confident that we’ve done all we can to make schools safe and it’s good for children’s mental health and wellbeing, as well as their learning, to be with their friends.”


    Information about school meals and the Government’s provision of laptops and data allowances to support remote learning is also available. You can find further support and guidance on the Devon County Council coronavirus advice page.

    Early Help outcomes framework, a one-minute guide

    6 Key themes

    Crime/ASB

    Indicator

    • Committed ASB /offence in last 12 months
    • Subject to probation or community order, suspended sentence or pre-court disposal
    • Household with higher than average police call outs
    • Involved with prevention services

    Outcome

    • Reduction in young persons offending 33% over last 6 months
    • Reduction in adults offending 60% over last 12 months
    • No ASB or escalation over last 6 months
    • No breach of order in last 12 months or over length of order
    • 50% reduction in police call out in past 6 months

    Education and attainment

    Indicator

    • Attendance is below 90%
    • Permanently excluded or 3+ fixed term exclusion in 3 terms
    • Identified as missing in education
    • Not in education, employment and training
    • SEND

    Outcome

    • Unauthorised absence is less than 10% over 3 terms
    • Where a child whose attendance was less than 40% has improved attendance by 50%
    • No permanent or >3 fixed term exclusions over 3 terms
    • Engaged in continuous education training or employment 3 terms/12 months

    Specific support needed

    Indicator

    • EHA/CP/CIN/
      Intervention, 2 or more MASH enquiries
    • Referred to Young Carers
    • Referred to Children Centre for targeted support
    • Homeless young person
    • Step Down to Early Help

    Outcome

    • Is not identified as CIN, or subject to a CP Plan, or where an Early Help assessment has been closed, is not reopened or initiated within 6 months
    • An improvement in outcomes evidenced through and EHA/Family Star or recognised ‘distance travelled’ tool
    • Step Down to universal services

    Work / Finances

    Indicator

    • Claiming out of work benefits
    • At risk of NEET/ Homelessness /Eviction
    • Unmanageable debt
    • Claiming universal credit with work related requirements attached

    Outcome

    • Adult in work or in education or training sustained for 13 or 26 weeks dependent on requirement
    • Not claiming Universal Credit. Have moved into ‘working enough’, ‘light touch’ groups. Claim closed due to earnings maintained
    • Suitable housing for 6 months
    • Debt managed for 6 months

    Being safe

    Indicator

    • Children/Adult experienced or perpetuated domestic abuse
    • Missing person
    • Risk of CSE
    • Has been subject to MASH enquiries, single assessment, CIN, CP planning, due to experiencing DVA

    Outcome

    • No reported Domestic Abuse incidents/ Sexual Violence/Abuse or Honour based abuse in past 6 months
    • No missing episodes
    • Reduction in CSE risk over 6 months
    • An improvement in outcomes evidenced through an EHA/ Family Star, or recognised ‘distance travelled’ tool

    Physical and mental health

    Indicator

    • Adult or young person requires mental health or substance/alcohol misuse support
    • Physical health problems that require support
    • At risk of deliberately harming his/her self
    • Malnourished, under or very overweight

    Outcome

    • Leaves substance/alcohol misuse programme having met treatment goals
    • No return to treatment
    • An improvement in outcomes evidenced through an EHA/ Family Star or recognised ‘distance travelled’ tool

    Our Early Help offer is underpinned by the 6 Key themes that take a whole family approach to support:

    1. Parents or children are involved in crime or anti-social behaviour. Crime and ASB
    2. Children not attending school regularly or are being excluded. Education and Attainment
    3. Children who need help (Vulnerable Children). Specific Support Needed
    4. At least one adult is out of work, young people are at risk of unemployment, and families are experiencing financial disadvantage. Work /Finances
    5. There is domestic violence and abuse, risk of CSE or missing children and young people. Being Safe
    6. Individuals have a range of health problems, physical or mental health. Physical and Mental Health

    Improving outcomes for families can enable Devon to access additional funding through payment by results claims (PBR) this funds the targeted services which provide support to families. To enable a potential claim a family needs to meet at least 2 out of the 6 key themes, which could increase as further needs is uncovered during the journey of support. The Right for Children recording system, Early Help tools, Assessment and Plan/Review, should be used, and are designed to support families to receive co-ordinated multi-agency support to improve and sustain outcomes. We need to evidence successful outcomes for all members of a family and these need to be sustained. Where worklessness in a family is a presenting issue a payment by results claim can be made where there is evidence that an adult family member has returned to employment for an expected period or is no longer in receipt of out of work benefits. Other presenting need should still be supported to improve outcomes for a family.

    Families must also have:
    1. An Assessment that in some way takes into account the needs of the whole family;
    2. An Action Plan that takes account of all (relevant) family members;
    3. There is a Lead Worker that is recognised by the family and other professionals involved with the family;
    4. The objectives in the family action plan are aligned to those in the area’s Troubled Families Outcomes Plan (Devon Early Help Outcomes Plan).

    So what does this mean for you, the practitioner?

    Think – Whole family
    Think – The 6 key themes 
    Think – Right for Children assessment and plan 
    Think – Lead Practitioner 
    Think – Significant and sustained engagement/ Outcomes 

    Further information on  the Devon Early Help system, offer, Early Help leaflet for families and the full Devon Early Help outcomes framework can be found at the Devon Children and Families Partnership website, under Early Help:

    https://www.dcfp.org.uk/early-help/early-help-information-for-workers/

    Early Help for families in Devon: Outcomes framework

    What is the aim of this outcomes plan?

    This document serves two main purposes:
    1. It describes how we intend to identify families that might need support
    2. It defines what we think would be a good result or positive outcomes for families

    Who’s responsible for this?

    The Devon Children and Families Partnership (DCFP), which is a partnership of all organisations and services that work with and for children, young people and families in Devon, have responsibility for this document, its development and review.

    What’s in this outcomes plan?

    This document describes how we are identifying families that might need a bit of extra help and what we think would be a positive outcome.

    We’ve framed this plan around six themes to make it easier to understand and digest:

    1. Crime and Anti-Social Behaviour – Staying safe in the community: Parents or children involved in crime or anti-social behaviour
    2. Education and Attainment – Getting a good education and skills for life: Children who have not been attending school regularly
    3. Specific Support Need – Improving children’s life chances: Children of all ages who need additional support, from the earliest years to adulthood
    4. Work and Finance – Improving living standards: Families experiencing or at risk of worklessness, homelessness or financial difficulties
    5. Being Safe – Staying safe in relationships: Families affected by domestic abuse
    6. Physical and Mental Health – Living well, improving physical and mental health and wellbeing: Parents and children with a range of health problems

    Crime and anti-social behaviour

    Identifying factors

    Who Identifying factor Time period
    Child/ young person (10 to 18yrs) Has been convicted or has received an out of court disposal (including a Community Resolution) Previous 12 months
    Child/ young person Engaged with prevention services Point of Entry
    Adult Has been convicted or received an out of court disposal (caution) Previous 12 months
    Adult prisoner Being less than 12 months from his/ her release date from prison and who will be going into a household with children or will have parenting responsibilities on release <12 months in the future
    Young Person Being less than 12 months from his/ her release date from a Secure Unit and who will be going into a household with children or will have parenting responsibilities on release <12 months in the future
    Adult Subject to licence, a community order or a suspended sentence who lives in a household with children or has parenting responsibilities Point of Entry
    Any individual Has received an anti-social behaviour intervention (defined as receiving a letter 2 or higher) Previous 12 months
    Adult/child/ young person Involved in a gang; County Lines linked crime and exploitation; serious violence such as knife crime, gun crime, robbery (Victim or Perpetrator – Repeat this in Being Safe for Victim) Previous 12 months
    Household Has a higher than average number of police call outs (based on local analysis) Previous 12 months
    Any individual Evidenced professional concern: potential crime problem or ASB (for example where it is acknowledged that criminal behaviour is taking place, but it is not legally proven) Previous 6 months

    Crime and anti-social behaviour

    Positive outcomes

    Who Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Child/ young person A 33% reduction in the number of proven offences committed 6 months
    Adult A 60% reduction in the number of proven offences committed 6 months
    Adult No offending whilst subject to licence, a community order or a suspended sentence Duration of licence/ order/ suspended sentence (variable)
    Any individual No incidents of anti-social behaviour 6 months
    Household A 50% reduction in the number of police call outs 6 months
    Family An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool 6 months
    Adult/ Child/young person Gang/Adolescent Safety Framework/County Lines – No longer at risk of exploitation, involved in gang activities 6 months

    Education and attainment

    Identifying factors

    Who Identifying factor Time period
    Child/ young person (<16) Whose attendance is below 90% for possible sessions. Previous 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16)

    Has received at least 3 fixed term exclusions or more

    OR:

    A primary school child who has had at least 5 school days of fixed term exclusion;

    OR:

    A child of any age who has had at least 10 days of fixed term exclusion.

    Previous 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16) Has been permanently excluded from school Previous 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16) Is identified as missing education (CME) or identified as a concern through the Missing Monday process Point of Entry
    Child (aged 3–6)

    Is not achieving at a good level of development in the early years foundation stage (EYFS) based on summer outcomes

    A child who did not achieve a good level of development at 5 Years in 3 prime areas of EYFS and 2 specific areas of literacy and mathematics

    Point of Entry
    Child (aged 2–4) Is eligible to but is not receiving free education entitlement Point of Entry
    Child/ young person Has a special educational need (SEN) Point of Entry
    Young person (aged 16–18 inclusive) Is not in education, employment or training (NEET) Point of Entry

    LLDD¹

    (aged 19-24 inclusive)

    Not in education where this is identified as the most appropriate provision Point of Entry
    Child/ young person Evidenced professional concern: for example, that a child/ young person is not receiving a suitable full-time education or a sudden decline in school attendance Point of Entry
    Child/ young person (<16) A child who is in alternative educational provision for children with behavioural problems
    Child/ young person (<16) Where Home Schooling has been identified as not providing a suitable education Point of Entry

    ¹Learner with learning difficulties and/ or disabilities

    Education and attainment

    Positive outcomes

    Who Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Child/ young person (<16)

    Unauthorised Absence is less than 10%

    OR:

    Where a child whose attendance was less than 40% has improved attendance by 50% at possible sessions

    3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16) Fewer than 3 fixed term exclusions 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16) Engaging in an agreed full-time timetable or a phased reintegration plan is in place and timescales are met 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (<16) Not identified as a concern through Missing Monday process 3 consecutive terms
    Child/ young person (aged 2–4) If eligible, is receiving free education entitlement 12 months (or until age limit reached)
    Young person (aged 16-18 inclusive) Engaged in continuous education, training or employment (ETE) 3 consecutive terms or 12 months (depending on ETE type)
    LLDD (aged 19-24 inclusive) Engaged in continuous education where this is identified as the most appropriate provision 3 consecutive terms or 12 months (depending on ETE type)
    Family An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool; OR: where professionals evidence that children are receiving a suitable education 6 months
    Child/ young person (<16)

    Child is attending an appropriate educational setting; OR:

    Home education provided is now deemed to be adequate.

    Equivalent of 3 consecutive terms

    Specific support need

    Identifying factors

    Who Identifying factor Time period
    Child/ young person Has had a multi-agency Early Help assessment initiated Previous 6 months
    Child/ young person Has been referred to young carers’ services for support Previous 12 months
    Child/ young person “Step down to Early Help” identified as an outcome at statutory case closure Previous 6 months
    Child/ young person Has been subject to 2 or more enquiries to MASH Previous 6 months
    Any individual Has been referred to a Children’s Centre for a targeted intervention Previous 6 months
    Young person (aged 16-17 inclusive) Presenting as homeless to a district or city council Previous 6 months
    Child/ young person Evidenced professional concern through the DCFP escalation/ de-escalation process Point of Entry
    Child/ young person Has Social, Emotional and Mental Health problems (SEMH) as identified in the School Census Point of Entry
    Child/ young person (0 – 25 yrs) Has an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP) Point of Entry
    Child/ young person Has been identified as a Child ‘In Need’ under section 17, Children Act 1989 Previous 12 months
    Child/ young person Has been subject to an inquiry under section 47, Children Act 1989 Previous 12 months
    Child/ young person Has been subject to a Child Protection Plan Previous 12 months
    Child/ young person

    Identified as having a delay in speech language and communication skills. This can include children not reaching the threshold in the communication domain at the 2-2.5 year old health check carried out by health visitors

    OR:

    Identified in early years settings or by health professionals as having speech, language and communication needs. The need is primary (not linked to another impairment), and the child does not have an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHCP)

    Point of Entry
    Child/ young person /Family Who is entitled, or has previously been entitled to 15 hours free early education for two-year-olds and has not taken this up (zero take up) Point of Entry

    Specific support need

    Positive outcomes

    Who Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Child/ young person Is not identified as a Child In Need or subject to a Child Protection Plan 6 months
    Family OR: Where a multi-agency Early Help Assessment has been closed, is not re-opened or initiated 6 months
    Family Improved score on outcomes star compared with initial score
    An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool
    6 months
    Family Goes through the formal process of step down to universal services, including where Children’s Social Work support post-Adoption and Special Guardianship Order (SGO) cases 6 months

    Work and finance

    Identifying factors

    Who Identifying factor Time period
    Adult or in exceptional circumstances 16 and 17 yrs old can claim the same benefits Is claiming job seeker’s allowance (JSA) Point of Entry
    Adult or in exceptional circumstances 16 and 17 yrs old can claim the same benefits Is claiming non-working benefits Point of Entry
    Adult or in exceptional circumstances 16 and 17 yrs old can claim the same benefits Is claiming universal credit with work-related requirements attached Point of Entry
    Adult or in exceptional circumstances 16 and 17 yrs old can claim the same benefits Is under threat of eviction Point of Entry
    Household Evidenced professional concern: for example, where there is a strong risk of worklessness or financial exclusion, including has unmanageable debt, i.e. payment demands are higher than total monthly income, significant rent arrears, experiencing in work poverty Previous 6 months
    Household Families at risk of homelessness or living in accommodation which is not reasonable for them to continue to occupy Point of Entry
    Young person (aged 16–18 inclusive) Is not in education, employment or training (NEET) Point of Entry
    Young person (aged 16–18 inclusive) A child is about to leave school and has no/few qualifications and no planned, education or employment. KS 4 data. Point of Entry

    Work and finance

    Positive outcomes

    Who Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Adult Not claiming job seeker’s allowance 26 consecutive weeks or 26 out of 30 weeks
    Adult Not claiming non-working benefits² where work is a realistic possibility 13 weeks
    Adult

    Not claiming universal credit or have moved into the “working enough” group, the “light touch” group, or those whose claim has been closed due to earnings.

    Earning threshold must exceed: Single person – £338 per month (or £272 per month for someone under 25), Couples – £541 per month
    And be in continuous employment at or above earnings threshold for 6 or 3 consecutive months depending on previous JSA/other benefits entitlement.

    3 months for those previously in ESA, IS, etc. groups

    6 months for those previously in JSA group

    Adult Made progress towards work where work is an appropriate option through undertaking work experience or a volunteering placement for 13 consecutive weeks During support period or within 6 months afterwards
    Adult Made progress towards work where work is an appropriate option through completing an accredited training or qualification(s) to improve skill levels During support period or within 6 months afterwards
    Household All debt is manageable 13 weeks
    Household No notices of eviction served 13 weeks
    Household Families occupy suitable housing and remain in suitable accommodation. 6 months
    Family An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool 6 months
    Young person (aged 16–18 inclusive) Engaged in continuous education, training or employment (ETE) 6 months

    ²Defined as employment support allowance (ESA), income support (IS), incapacity benefit (IB), carer’s allowance, serious disability allowance (SDA)

    Being safe

    Identifying factors

    Identifying factors Time period
    Household There has been a domestic abuse incident Previous 12 months
    Adult/Child/ young person Known to local services has experienced or is currently experiencing or is at risk of experiencing domestic violence or abuse. Previous 12 months
    Any individual Is engaged with specialist domestic abuse support services Point of Entry

    Child/ young person

    Parent/Adult

    Has been listed as missing or missing incidents Previous 12 months

    Child/ young person

    Parent/Adult

    Has been identified as being at risk of exploitation, including sexual exploitation Previous 12 months

    Child/ young person

    Parent/Adult

    Has been subject to 2 or more enquiries to MARAC Previous 12 months
    Household There has been a fire incident Previous 12 months
    Household Has been referred for a home safety assessment Previous 12 months
    Any individual Evidenced professional concern: for example, where there are safety-related concerns that haven’t been officially recognised Previous 12 months
    Young person/ Adult Known to local services has experienced, is currently experiencing or is at risk of experiencing sexual violence or abuse Previous 12 months
    Young person/ Adult Known to local services has experienced, is currently experiencing or is at risk of experiencing ‘honour-based’ abuse Previous 12 months
    Young person/ Adult Known to local services as having perpetrated an incident of domestic violence or abuse Previous 12 months
    Young person/ Adult Known to local services as having perpetrated an incident of sexual violence or abuse Previous 12 months
    Young person/ Adult Known to local services as having perpetrated an incident of so-called ‘honour-based’ violence or abuse Previous 12 months
    Family member/ Household Been subject to a police call out for at least one domestic incident, including for so-called ‘honour-based’ abuse Previous 12 months
    Child/Young Person /Adult Has been subject to previous MASH Enquiries, Single Assessments, Child in Need, Child Protection Planning as a result of experiencing DVA Previous 12 months
    Child/Young Person Has been affected by Parental Conflict Previous 12 months

    Being safe

    Positive outcomes

    Row Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Household No reported domestic abuse incidents; sexual violence or abuse; or “honour based” abuse 6 months
    Adult Reduction in CAADA DASH score 6 months
    Child/ young person No missing episodes 6 months
    Child/ young person Does not re-enter the MACSE process 6 months
    Household No deliberate fire incidents 6 months
    Family An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool 6 months
    Adult/Young Person/Child Adult and Child feel safer evidenced by distanced travelled tool, e.g. About You and your life, On- Track Child/Adult Power assessment 6 months
    Child/young person Reducing Parental Conflict – Parents successfully completed an evidence-based parenting programme to reduce conflict; or that a distance travelled outcome indicates that parental conflict has been reduced in the family home 6 months

    Physical and mental health

    Identifying factors

    Who Identifying factor Time period
    Any individual Has a mental health problem that requires more support Point of Entry
    Adult Has a substance or alcohol misuse problem Point of Entry
    Child/ young person Has a substance or alcohol misuse problem or is exposed to substance use in their home environment Point of Entry
    Any individual Is at risk of deliberately harming themselves Previous 6 months
    Child/ young person (aged 16 or under) Has conceived a child 12 months
    Any individual Has a physical health problem that requires more support Point of Entry
    Any individual Evidenced professional concern: for example, if a child/young person is not receiving vaccinations or a pregnant person is smoking or other poorly managed health problems including diabetes, obesity, malnutrition, underweight Point of Entry
    Adult/ young person Expectant or new parents with a mental health or substance misuse problem and other health factors which may affect their parenting, or a young child where there are concerns regarding their physical, social or emotional development. This could include mothers who are receiving a Universal Plus service or participating in a Family Nurse Partnership. Previous 12 months

    Physical and mental health

    Positive outcomes

    Who Outcome Time period after receiving support
    Any individual receiving substance/ alcohol misuse treatment at P.O.E
    Any individual
    Leaves the substance/ alcohol misuse programme in an agreed and planned way having met his/ her treatment goals variable
    Any individual receiving substance/ alcohol misuse treatment at P.O.E
    Any individual
    No return to treatment ³ 6 months
    Family An improvement in outcomes evidenced through the relevant section of the Early Help Assessment and Plan, for example: the “Worry Scale” in Right for Children; Family Star or other recognised distance travelled tool; OR through Statutory Assessment 6 months

    ³Caution should be exercised when applying this outcome measure. No return to treatment does not necessarily mean that an individual does not need treatment; it would be worse if someone needed help and did not feel comfortable accessing services to receive it.

    Appendix 1: glossary of terms

    Child/ young person In the realm of Early Help, unless specified otherwise, a child/ young person is someone aged under 18.
    Child missing education The Department for Education’s definition of children “who are not registered pupils at a school and are not receiving suitable education otherwise than at a school.”
    Missing Monday Weekly meetings held by the Head of Education and Learning to review and monitor children missing education.
    Parenting responsibilities This is to capture those situations where a person might not be living at the same address as an established family, but, in a professional’s view, has significant influence on a child/ young person.

     

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